Focus Area: Native Americans

American Indians in Texas – Spanish Colonial Missions

March 2, 2018

The American Indians in Texas at the Spanish Colonial Missions (AIT-SCM) is a nonprofit organization established by the Tap Pilam Coahuiltecan Nation, descendants of the aboriginal people who populated South Texas and Northeast Mexico. The organization works for the preservation and protection of the culture and traditions of the Native American tribes and other indigenous people who resided in the Spanish colonial missions. AIT-SCM provides a wide array of programs that address the social needs and cultural aspirations of the diverse indigenous communities in San Antonio, Texas. American Indians in Texas at the Spanish Colonial Missions is a proud member of the San Antonio Fatherhood Campaign.

civic engagement, community organizing, criminal justice, education, environment, housing, Native Americans, race equality, voter engagement, youth

Beyond Single-Issue Philanthropy: Fifteen Years of Funding Across Silos

November 14, 2016 / Luz Vega-Marquis

Over four days in May 2016, a small group of young people gathered around a conference table at Marguerite Casey Foundation’s Seattle offices to contemplate and plan their collective future. Corleone Ham came in from Long Beach, CA, where he helps run the Young Men’s Empowerment Program at Khmer Girls in Action and, in his spare time, battles educational disparities. Crystal Sahler represented the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, which she joined after her mother’s sudden death left Crystal homeless at age 17. Alejandro Guizar Lozano flew in from Tennessee, where a successful battle to halt his own threatened deportation led him to join the Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition in the fight to halt the deportations of other young DREAMers. All were past or current recipients of Marguerite Casey Foundation’s Sargent Shriver Youth Warriors Against Poverty Leadership Award, which honors young activists for vision, passion and dedication to improving the lives of families and communities. Each had been recognized for his or her personal accomplishments. Now, they had gathered to test a key principle of the Foundation’s movement building strategy. Could they find what Lindsey Harris, co-executive director of the Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition, called a “common purpose” — a sense that their various struggles were intertwined, and that any lasting solution must encompass all of them?

child care, civic engagement, community development, community organizing, criminal justice, education, elder care, employment, environment, farmworkers, food security/access to health food, health care, housing, immigration, LGBT, living wage, Native Americans, predatory lending, race equality, tax policy, transportation, voter engagement, workers rights, youth

Building a Prosperity Movement for America’s Families

May 16, 2011 / Luz Vega-Marquis

As we endeavor to turn the corner with Equal Voice and map our next steps, we are ever mindful of what a critical moment this is for our families and their children. We are operating in a time of great change: an uncertain economy, shifting demographics, a continually accelerating age of information, changing roles and practices in philanthropy, and attacks on what have long been considered the fundamental roles of government, as reflected in the unrelenting efforts to slash the budgets of federal and state programs that primarily serve low-income individuals and families. These trends will result in tremendous changes in the way people work, educate their children, meet their basic needs, and plan for the future. We are not yet in a place — and may never be where we can say: This is now the landscape … how will we respond? So, our challenge is to meet the constantly shifting landscape with constantly new strategies, new thinking, new relationships and new resources that are rooted in firm values and a vision of a better future for families.

community development, Native Americans

Children’s Defense Fund: Southern Rural Black Women’s Initiative

March 6, 2018

SRBWI works to eradicate historical race, gender, class, cultural and religious barriers facing Southern rural Black women. We will nourish the internal capacity of women to take responsibility for their own lives, personally and externally, engage women in advocacy and policy initiatives that redirect local, state and federal resources to help ensure women’s access to economic and social justice, develop an asset-based economic development strategy that invests in women and communities to help lift women out of poverty, and build organizational capacity within the region to sustain our work.
Connect with women’s groups committed to human rights and economic and social justice.

civic engagement, community development, criminal justice, health care, Native Americans, race equality, voter engagement, youth

Creative Philanthropy in Practice

November 12, 2006 / Luz Vega-Marquis

I am pleased to share with you the executive summary of Creative Philanthropy: Toward a New Philanthropy for the Twenty-first Century by Helmut K. Anheier and Diana Leal, a recently published book that is stirring up quite a bit of conversation in the philanthropic sector. At the core of the book are two questions meant to challenge Foundations to think creatively: Are Foundations aware of their potential to create change? Are Foundations doing the best they possibly can in the current environment? The authors assert that most Foundations are not aware of their potential to use their resources to effect policy changes that address issues of equity and social justice. They urge Foundations to act as innovators, change-agents, conductors, enablers and convenors to advance a public discourse that will change the public agenda. The case studies in the book demonstrate that Foundations practicing creative philanthropy are the most effective at creating change. The authors conclude that if more Foundations practiced creative philanthropy, Foundations would emerge as central institutions in society, capable of effecting change on a broad scale as the “underwriters of new conversation, debate and change.”

child care, civic engagement, community development, community organizing, criminal justice, education, employment, environment, farmworkers, food security/access to health food, health care, housing, immigration, LGBT, living wage, Native Americans, predatory lending, race equality, tax policy, transportation, voter engagement, workers rights, youth

NAVA Education Project

March 2, 2018

Our mission is to unite community stakeholders to actively improve the quality of life for Native American communities and protect the continuity of Native American cultures. We promote awareness and action on issues facing Native American communities through community organizing and education strategies. We are committed to social, economic and environmental justice principles that advance healthy and sustainable communities for Native families living in New Mexico. We seek to ensure fairness while creating opportunities for Native American families to succeed in both our traditional and contemporary world. Join us as we build a secure and healthy future for Native American people living in New Mexico!

civic engagement, community organizing, education, living wage, Native Americans, predatory lending, voter engagement

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